I'm Monica. Twenty-three. Living in the Midwest.

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mabelmoments:

This mother orangutan and her baby were saved by the animal charity Four Paws from people who are paid to kill them. There are allegations that many palm oil companies in the area of Borneo pay rewards of up to 1m Indonesian rupiah (about £70) for each ape killed. The Four Paws team found the pictured orangutans surrounded by a group of local youths intending to kill them for a bounty. Photograph: Vier Pfoten/Four Paws/Rex

mabelmoments:

This mother orangutan and her baby were saved by the animal charity Four Paws from people who are paid to kill them. There are allegations that many palm oil companies in the area of Borneo pay rewards of up to 1m Indonesian rupiah (about £70) for each ape killed. The Four Paws team found the pictured orangutans surrounded by a group of local youths intending to kill them for a bounty. Photograph: Vier Pfoten/Four Paws/Rex

futurejournalismproject:

Orangutans, With iPads
The BBC writes of an experiment at the Milwaukee zoo where orangutans are given access to iPads so that they use basic drawing apps, and kick back and watch some primate video.
The next goal is to wire the zoo and have the orangutans video chat with others elsewhere.
Via the BBC:

“Orangutans love looking at each other,” said [conservationist Richard] Zimmerman, adding that one of the apes, 31-year-old MJ, is a fan of David Attenborough programmes.
“The orangutans loved seeing videos of themselves - so there is a little vanity going on - and they like seeing videos of the orangutans who are in the other end of the enclosure.
“So if we incorporate cameras, they can watch each other.”
Other centres, zoos and sanctuaries are said to want to get involved “immediately” and are just waiting for more devices to become available.
“We’ve been limited to Milwaukee because we haven’t been able to get enough iPads,” Mr Zimmerman said.
“We’ve been waiting for the iPad 3 to come out to make the iPad 1 really obsolete, so we can pick up a few.

Image: An orangutan, with an iPad, via ExtremeTech

Mahal with an iPad! 

futurejournalismproject:

Orangutans, With iPads

The BBC writes of an experiment at the Milwaukee zoo where orangutans are given access to iPads so that they use basic drawing apps, and kick back and watch some primate video.

The next goal is to wire the zoo and have the orangutans video chat with others elsewhere.

Via the BBC:

“Orangutans love looking at each other,” said [conservationist Richard] Zimmerman, adding that one of the apes, 31-year-old MJ, is a fan of David Attenborough programmes.

“The orangutans loved seeing videos of themselves - so there is a little vanity going on - and they like seeing videos of the orangutans who are in the other end of the enclosure.

“So if we incorporate cameras, they can watch each other.”

Other centres, zoos and sanctuaries are said to want to get involved “immediately” and are just waiting for more devices to become available.

“We’ve been limited to Milwaukee because we haven’t been able to get enough iPads,” Mr Zimmerman said.

“We’ve been waiting for the iPad 3 to come out to make the iPad 1 really obsolete, so we can pick up a few.

Image: An orangutan, with an iPad, via ExtremeTech

Mahal with an iPad! 

(Source: futurejournalismproject)

wildestandwilder:

Sumatran orangutan ( Pongo pygmaeus ) - Rare and protected animal

Type:Mammal

Diet:Omnivore

Average life span in the wild:30 to 40 years

Size:Standing height, 4 to 5 ft (1.2 to 1.5m)

Weight:73 to 180 lbs (33 to 82 kg)

havesonicwilltravel:

James & Other Apes

While watching a nature program on primates I was struck by their facial similarity to our own. Humans are clearly different to animals, but the great apes inhabit that grey area between man and animal. I thought it would be interesting to try to photograph gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos and orangutans using the aesthetic of the passport photograph- its ubiquitous style inferring the idea of identity.

I decided against photographing in zoos or using ‘animal actors’ but traveled to Cameroon, Republic of Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo and Indonesia to meet orphans of the bush meat trade and live pet trade.

-James Mollison